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Sonnet 130 poem?

What does the poem Sonnet 130 mean?

William Shakespeare And A Summary of Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130 is an unusual poem because it turns the idea of female beauty on its head and offers the reader an alternative view of what it’s like to love a woman, warts and all, despite her shortcomings.

What is the main theme of Sonnet 130?

In Sonnet 130, the theme “Women and Femininity” is connected to the idea of appearances. This poem is all about female beauty and our expectations and stereotypes about the way women ought to look.

Is Sonnet 130 by Shakespeare a love poem?

Sonnet 130” is one of the hundreds of sonnets that Shakespeare wrote during his lifetime. It is a love poem about an unknown woman whom Shakespeare describes as his mistress.

What does and yet by heaven I think my love as rare mean?

Here are two lines in plain English: the speaker thinks that his lover is as wonderful (“rare“) as any woman (“any she”) who was ever misrepresented (“belied”) by an exaggerated comparison (“false compare”). He can just tell his mistress, plainly and simply, that he loves her for who she is.

What is a metaphor in Sonnet 130?

William Shakespeare a famous playwright and poet whom created, “Sonnet 130” is not the ideal love poem that comes to mind. Another metaphor the poet uses is, “If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head” (4). The wires growing from her head is her hair which leads you to picture that her hair is black and straight.

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What type of poem is Sonnet 130?

Sonnet 130 consists of 14 lines. It is a traditional English love sonnet, which is divided into three quatrains and a concluding heroic couplet in the end. The poem consists of external rhymes. Its rhyme scheme has the form abab cdcd efef gg.

What does Sonnet 130 say about love?

Sonnet 130 is a kind of inverted love poem. It implies that the woman is very beautiful indeed, but suggests that it is important for this poet to view the woman he loves realistically. False or indeed “poetical” metaphors, conventional exaggerations about a woman’s beauty, will not do in this case.

What is the attitude of Sonnet 130?

The tone conveys the mood of the poem. For me, the tone of sonnet 130 is mocking. This is an interesting sonnet, in that even though the speaker is describing his lady love, he seems more concerned with slamming the cliched descriptions usually used to describe a love in poetry.

What is the best summary of the central idea of Sonnet 130?

The speaker believes that his beloved is beautiful and amazing beyond compare. The speaker praises traditional poetry and celebrates its power to express true love. The speaker mocks the ugliness of his mistress and wants to end their relationship.

What is the irony in Sonnet 130?

Shakespeare mainly uses the verbal irony in sonnet 130. Actually verbal irony means the poet or speaker of the poem says one thing but he or she actually means another meaning. For instance in the poem where his mistress eyes are comparing with the sun, Lips with coral, Breast with snow and blackness with wire hair.

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How is imagery used in Sonnet 130?

Shakespeare uses imagery in “Sonnet 130” to parody conventional Petrarchan love language. For example, he notes that his lover’s eyes are not like the “sun,” her lips are not “coral,” her cheeks are not “roses,” and her breath is not always like “perfumes.” Nevertheless, he still loves her dearly.

Who is the dark lady in Sonnet 130?

Sonnet 130 is the poet’s pragmatic tribute to his uncomely mistress, commonly referred to as the dark lady because of her dun complexion. The dark lady, who ultimately betrays the poet, appears in sonnets 127 to 154.

SONNET 130 PARAPHRASE
That music hath a far more pleasing sound; That music has a more pleasing sound.

What literary devices are used in Sonnet 130?

Some main literary devices used in Sonnet 130 are juxtaposition, metaphor, rhyme, meter, parody, blazon, assonance, and alliteration.

What is the problem in Sonnet 130?

The “problem” in Sonnet 130 is that Shakespeare is attempting to write an over-the-top sonnet full of elevated language about a woman who is clearly only ordinary looking — or perhaps even ugly.

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