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Often asked: Homage to my hips poem?

What does homage to my hips poem mean?

As the title suggests, the poem is a celebration of the speaker’s body and femininity with a focus on her “big hips.” These, the speaker says, demand “space” in society, refuse to be “held back,” and have “never been enslaved.” The poem is also a celebration specifically of Black womanhood, associating the speaker’s

Who wrote Homage to My Hips?

homage to my hips by Lucille Clifton | Poetry Foundation.

What is the tone of homage to my hips?

Just like Phenomenal Woman, Homage to My Hips is a poem that’s built to be said out loud in a tone oozing with sass, good humor, confidence, and cocksure conviction. It’s a piece that positively thrums with joy.

What The Mirror said?

What the mirror said”, not unalike from “homage to my hips”, is a testimony to a “hard-won self-love” (1124 Norton Anthology). In this poem, which was published in her 1980 collection, Two-Headed Woman, “using the exclamatory style of a gospel song, Clifton infuses wit into a poem of self-affirmation” (72 Holladay).

Who is the speaker in homage to my hips?

The speaker of “homage to my hips,” however, is a real woman. The visual and kinetic imagery of the passive and delimited motion of the spinning top, representing the male, contrasts with the opposites in “they go where they want to go./ they do what they want to do” (lines 9-10), representing the female.

What kind of topics did Lucille Clifton write about?

Lucille Clifton, original name Thelma Lucille Sayles, (born June 27, 1936, Depew, New York, U.S.—died February 13, 2010, Baltimore, Maryland), American poet whose works examine family life, racism, and gender.

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What is a homage poem?

In literature, a homage is a work created in honor of something or someone, generally to show one’s respect. Basically, think of it like this: people create things in honor of other things that they like, or create new versions of them, and that’s homage.

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