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Quick Answer: Which Famous Greek Philosopher And Writer Wrote The Allegory Of The Cave?

The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato’s Cave, is an allegory presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work Republic (514a–520a) to compare “the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature”.

Who conceptualized the the allegory of the cave?

Plato, “Allegory of the Cave” | ENG 101 College Writing I.

When was the allegory of the cave written?

Plato’s famous allegory of the cave, written around 380 BCE, is one of the most important and influential passages of The Republic, and is considered a staple of Western literature.

Who wrote the allegory of the cave What is the main point of this story?

Plato’s Best-Known Metaphor About Enlightenment The Allegory of the Cave is a story from Book VII in the Greek philosopher Plato’s masterpiece “The Republic,” written around B.C.E. 375. It is probably Plato’s best-known story, and its placement in “The Republic” is significant.

Which philosophy is presented by Plato’s allegory of the cave?

Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” is a concept devised by the philosopher to ruminate on the nature of belief versus knowledge. The allegory states that there exists prisoners chained together in a cave. Behind the prisoners is a fire, and between the fire and the prisoners are people carrying puppets or other objects.

What is Plato saying in the allegory of the cave?

The ‘Allegory Of The Cave’ is a theory put forward by Plato, concerning human perception. Plato claimed that knowledge gained through the senses is no more than opinion and that, in order to have real knowledge, we must gain it through philosophical reasoning.

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Who wrote allegory of the cave?

The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato’s Cave, was presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work Republic (514a–520a) to compare “the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature”. It is written as a dialogue between Plato’s brother Glaucon and his mentor Socrates, narrated by the latter.

What does Socrates argue with the cave allegory in Book 7?

In Book VII, Socrates presents the most beautiful and famous metaphor in Western philosophy: the allegory of the cave. This metaphor is meant to illustrate the effects of education on the human soul. Socrates describes a dark scene. A group of people have lived in a deep cave since birth, never seeing the light of day.

What was Plato’s real name?

It was claimed that Plato’s real name was Aristocles, and that ‘Plato’ was a nickname (roughly ‘the broad’) derived either from the width of his shoulders, the results of training for wrestling, or from the breadth of his style, or from the size of his forehead.

Who is Socrates philosophy?

Socrates believed that philosophy should achieve practical results for the greater well-being of society. He attempted to establish an ethical system based on human reason rather than theological doctrine. Socrates pointed out that human choice was motivated by the desire for happiness.

Why is Plato allegory of the cave important?

One of the most important allegories ever to be gifted to humankind is Allegory of the Cave. Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is one of the most potent and pregnant of allegories that describe human condition in both its fallen and risen states. That is, the human existence in its most profound and profane states.

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Which philosopher did Plato study under?

Plato was a philosopher during the 5th century BCE. He was a student of Socrates and later taught Aristotle. He founded the Academy, an academic program which many consider to be the first Western university.

What is the allegory of the cave a metaphor for?

The allegory of the cave is a metaphor designed to illustrate human perception, ideologies, illusions, opinions, ignorance and sensory appearances. The cave is a prison for individuals who base their knowledge based on ideologies.

What does the allegory of the cave teach us?

So, the teacher in the allegory of the cave guided the prisoner from the darkness and into the light (light represents truth); education involves seeing the truth. Plato believed that you have to desire to learn new things; if people do not desire to learn what is true, then you cannot force them to learn.

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