Interesting

Quick Answer: Examples of literary devices in literature?

What are the 20 literary devices?

20 Top Poetic Devices to Remember

  • Allegory. An allegory is a story, poem, or other written work that can be interpreted to have a secondary meaning.
  • Alliteration. Alliteration is the repetition of a sound or letter at the beginning of multiple words in a series.
  • Apostrophe.
  • Assonance.
  • Blank Verse.
  • Consonance.
  • Enjambment.
  • Meter.

What are examples of literary devices?

Literary Devices List: 11 Common Literary Devices

  • Metaphor. Metaphors, also known as direct comparisons, are one of the most common literary devices.
  • Simile.
  • Imagery.
  • Symbolism.
  • Personification.
  • Hyperbole.
  • Irony.
  • Juxtaposition.

What are the 15 literary devices?

15 Literary devices to use in your writing:

  • Allusion.
  • Diction.
  • Alliteration.
  • Allegory.
  • Colloquialism.
  • Euphemism.
  • Flashbacks.
  • Foreshadowing.

What are the 7 literary devices?

Devices studied include allusion, diction, epigraph, euphemism, foreshadowing, imagery, metaphor/simile, personification, point-of-view and structure.

What are the 16 literary devices?

Terms in this set (16)

  • Aphorism. expresses an opinion or original thought; proverb; words to live by.
  • Paradox. self contradicting statement but expresses the truth.
  • Allusion. an implied or indirect reference to a person, event, or thing or to another part of the text.
  • Archetype.
  • Antithesis.
  • Red Herring.
  • Mood.
  • Foreshadow.

What are literary devices in English?

Here are 10 of the most common literary devices:

  • Simile.
  • Metaphor.
  • Imagery.
  • Symbolism.
  • Flashbacks.
  • Foreshadowing.
  • Motif.
  • Allegory.

Is irony a literary device?

The definition of irony as a literary device is a situation in which there is a contrast between expectation and reality. For example, the difference between what something appears to mean versus its literal meaning. Irony is associated with both tragedy and humor.

You might be interested:  Quick Answer: Garden of eden symbolism in literature?

What literary devices does Shakespeare use?

Shakespeare uses three main techniques, or literary devices, in Macbeth: irony, imagery, and symbolism.

What literary device is comparison?

ANALOGY (Rhetorical Device): Uses comparison to develop an idea. Unlike metaphor and simile, it looks for “like” things to compare. It is used to illustrate or develop something hard to describe.

What are the 8 literary elements?

8 Elements of a Story Explained

  • Setting.
  • Character.
  • Plot.
  • Conflict.
  • Theme.
  • Point-of-view.
  • Tone.
  • Style.

What are the 9 literary devices?

Terms in this set (24)

  • Metaphor. A figure of speech founded on resemlance eg.
  • Hypebole. Exaggeration; a figure of speech exceeding truth.
  • Onomatapoeia. The formation of words by imitation of sounds eg.
  • Simile. A figure of speech consisting in likening one thing to another.
  • Analogy.
  • Personification.
  • Alliteration.
  • Foreshadowing.

What are the literary devices in poetry?

Poetic Devices

  • Alliteration.
  • Assonance.
  • Imagery.
  • Metaphor.
  • Onomatopoeia.
  • Personification.
  • Refrain.
  • Rhyme.

What is the difference between literary elements and literary devices?

A literary device is any specific aspect of literature, or a particular work, which we can recognize, identify, interpret and/or analyze. Unlike literary elements, literary techniques are not necessarily present in every text.

How many literary devices are there in English?

The various literary devices used in English Literature are

Alliteration, Analogy, Allegory, Anaphora, Metaphor, Simile, Aphorism, Oxymoron, Onomatopoeia, Eulogy, Elegy, and others. Alliteration: It is the device in which a number of words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close together in a series.

What are the main literary elements?

A literary element refers to components of a literary work (character, setting, plot, theme, frame, exposition, ending/denouement, motif, titling, narrative point-‐of-‐view). These are technical terms for the “what” of a work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *