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Litotes in poetry

What is Litotes and examples?

Litotes is an understatement in which a positive statement is expressed by negating its opposite. … The classic example of litotes is the phrase “not bad.” By negating the word “bad,” you’re saying that something is good, or at least OK. However, in most contexts it’s an understatement. For example: “Not bad!

What are some examples of Litotes?

Litotes Examples in Common Expressions

  • It’s not rocket science. …
  • He’s no spring chicken. …
  • It’s not my first rodeo. …
  • He isn’t the brightest bulb in the box. …
  • You won’t be sorry you bought this knife set. …
  • I don’t deny that it was wrong. …
  • The trip wasn’t a total loss. …
  • He doesn’t always have the best sense of direction.

What does Litotes mean?

In rhetoric, litotes (/ˈlaɪtətiːz/, US: /ˈlɪtətiːz/ or /laɪˈtoʊtiːz/; also known classically as antenantiosis or moderatour) is a figure of speech and form of verbal irony in which understatement is used to emphasize a point by stating a negative to further affirm a positive, often incorporating double negatives for …

What is the effect of Litotes?

Litotes intentionally use understatements to create an ironic effect. They’re also double negative statements since they confirm one idea by negating the opposite. More importantly, though, it brings attention to a certain idea.

What are the 5 examples of metaphor?

Everyday Life Metaphors

  • John’s suggestion was just a Band-Aid for the problem.
  • The cast on his broken leg was a plaster shackle.
  • Laughter is the music of the soul.
  • America is a melting pot.
  • Her lovely voice was music to his ears.
  • The world is a stage.
  • My kid’s room is a disaster area.
  • Life is a rollercoaster.
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What is an example of a chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe Examples

  • Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( …
  • O holy night! …
  • Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( …
  • O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( …
  • Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( …
  • Welcome, O life!

What does Paradox mean?

noun. a statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth. a self-contradictory and false proposition. any person, thing, or situation exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature. an opinion or statement contrary to commonly accepted opinion.

What does hyperbole mean?

obvious and intentional exaggeration. an extravagant statement or figure of speech not intended to be taken literally, as “to wait an eternity.”

What idiom means?

An idiom is a phrase or expression that typically presents a figurative, non-literal meaning attached to the phrase; but some phrases become figurative idioms while retaining the literal meaning of the phrase. Categorized as formulaic language, an idiom’s figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning.

What is oxymoron and give examples?

An oxymoron is a self-contradicting word or group of words (as in Shakespeare’s line from Romeo and Juliet, “Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!”). A paradox is a statement or argument that seems to be contradictory or to go against common sense, but that is yet perhaps still true—for example, “less is more.”

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How do you use Litotes in a sentence?

In truth, a litotes will use irony to emphasize an idea without minimizing its importance. For example, a friend might expect her roommate to talk about someone who’s obviously wealthy by saying, “He’s filthy rich.” However, when she comes out and says, “Well, he’s not exactly a pauper,” it’s a little unexpected.

What’s a satire?

the use of irony, sarcasm, ridicule, or the like, in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc. a literary composition, in verse or prose, in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule.

What is the difference between Litotes and irony?

Litotes-ironical understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of its contrary (e.g., you won’t be sorry, meaning you’ll be glad ). Irony-the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.

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