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FAQ: Antimetabole examples in literature?

What is Antimetabole in literature?

In rhetoric, antimetabole (/æntɪməˈtæbəliː/ AN-ti-mə-TAB-ə-lee) is the repetition of words in successive clauses, but in transposed order; for example, “I know what I like, and I like what I know”.

What is Antimetabole used for?

What Is The Purpose Of Antimetabole? Antimetabole exists primarily as a rhetorical and literary device, serving to ingrain a phrase or question in an audience’s mind.

What is an example of anaphora in literature?

Anaphora is a figure of speech in which words repeat at the beginning of successive clauses, phrases, or sentences. For example, Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech contains anaphora: “So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

What is Antimetabole in figure of speech?

Antimetabole is a figure of speech in which a phrase is repeated, but with the order of words reversed. John F. Kennedy’s words, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country,” is a famous example of antimetabole.

What is an example of Antimetabole?

Antimetabole is derived from a Greek word which means “turning about.” It is a literary term or device that involves repeating a phrase in reverse order. For example: “You like it; it likes you.” “Fair is foul and foul is fair.”

What are the examples of parallelism?

In English grammar, parallelism (also called parallel structure or parallel construction) is the repetition of the same grammatical form in two or more parts of a sentence. I like to jog, bake, paint, and watching movies. I like to jog, bake, paint, and watch movies.

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What is an example of Polysyndeton?

Polysyndeton is a stylistic device in which several coordinating conjunctions are used in succession in order to achieve an artistic effect. For example, in the sentence, “We have ships and men and money and stores,” the coordinating conjunction “and” is used in quick succession to join words occurring together.

What is an example of chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

What is an example of Zeugma?

A zeugma is a literary term for using one word to modify two other words, in two different ways. An example of a zeugma is, “She broke his car and his heart.” For example, you could use the zeugma, “I lost my keys and my temper.” In Greek, zeugma means “a yoking,” as in yoking one word to two ideas.

What are 5 examples of repetition?

Examples of Repetition: Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow. “Oh, woeful, oh woeful, woeful, woeful day! “And miles to go before I sleep, and miles to go before I sleep.”

What is parallelism in writing?

Parallelism is the matching of the forms of words, phrases, or clauses within a sentence. Editing your work for parallel construction improves clarity and emphasizes your points.

What are 5 examples of assonance?

Examples of Assonance:

  • The light of the fire is a sight. (
  • Go slow over the road. (
  • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers (repetition of the short e and long i sounds)
  • Sally sells sea shells beside the sea shore (repetition of the short e and long e sounds)
  • Try as I might, the kite did not fly. (
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What is Antiphrasis in literature?

Antiphrasis is the rhetorical device of saying the opposite of what is actually meant in such a way that it is obvious what the true intention is. Some authors treat antiphrasis as merely a synonym for irony.

How do you say Antimetabole?

A.Word.A.Day

  1. A.Word.A.Day.
  2. (AN-ti-muh-TAB-uh-lee)
  3. noun: A repetition of words or an idea in a reverse order.
  4. From Greek antimetabole, from anti- (opposite) + metabole (change), from meta- (after, along) + bole (a throw).
  5. “Carl Sagan’s antimetabole ‘absence of evidence is not evidence of absence’ immediately comes to mind.”

What is a anaphora?

An anaphora is a rhetorical device in which a word or expression is repeated at the beginning of a number of sentences, clauses, or phrases.

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